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3 edition of role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae found in the catalog.

role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae

Michael L. McManus

role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae

by Michael L. McManus

  • 352 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station in Upper Darby, Pa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gypsy moth -- Behavior,
  • Gypsy moth -- Dispersal

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Michael L. McManus.
    SeriesResearch paper NE -- 267.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination10 p. :
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17615956M
    OCLC/WorldCa26738993

    Indeed, first-instar monarch larvae exhibit specialized foraging behavior: once they have hatched from their egg and eaten part or all of the egg shell, they closely graze down trichomes to reach the surface and then carefully chew trenches through the epidermis to create a latex-free feeding zone (Agrawal ). Nonetheless, neonates can.   Part of this discrepancy is probably due to a failure to account for the greater propensity to disperse of newly eclosed males, as revealed by a subsequent MRR experiment. We also propose that wind-assisted dispersal of newly hatched larvae is additionally necessary to account for the higher level of lifetime dispersal.

    The Role of Behavior in the Dispersal of Newly Hatched Gyspy Moth Larvae Research Paper NE; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: Upper Darby, PA, USA, ; pp. 1– Full text of "Gypsy moth management in the United States: a cooperative approach: final environmental impact statement" See other formats.

    There are three subspecies, which are European, Asian, and Japanese. Although all three are similar in appearance, Asian gypsy moths tend to have the largest larvae. ("Gypsy Moth", ; "Lymantria dispar (insect)", ) Newly hatched larvae are black, hairy caterpillars, and as they age, they grow two rows of blue, then red, spots on their backs. Newly hatched larvae are approximately 4 mm long. At first, they appear tan-coloured but within several hours they turn black. They are very hairy and have 'air hairs', which may aid in dispersal. The 'air hairs' are simple setae with a bulb-like structure in the middle that looks like a .


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Role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae by Michael L. McManus Download PDF EPUB FB2

Role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae. Upper Darby, Pa.: Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, (OCoLC) The Role of Behavior in the dispersal of Newly Hatched Gypsy Moth larvae ABSTRACT Newly hatched gypsy moth larvae are morphologically and be- haviorally adapted for airborne dispersal.

The die1 periodicity of both hatching and dispersal from the egg mass and photopositive behaviorCited by: The role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae / By Michael L. McManus. Abstract. Cover graphy: p.

Mode of access: Internet Topics: Gypsy moth, Gypsy moth. Publisher: Upper Darby, Pa Author: Michael L. McManus. hatched Download hatched or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format. The Role Of Behavior In The Dispersal Of Newly Hatched Gypsy Moth Larvae.

Author by: Michael L. McManus Languange: en This page book features controlled text with age-appropriate vocabulary and simple, clear sentences. A cm length of silk causes a 30 to 50% reduction in the settling velocity of larvae.

The role of settling velocity in the passive dispersal of gypsy moth larvae is discussed in the context of. AERIAL DISPERSAL BEHAVIOR OF LARVAL BAGWORMS, THYRIDOPTERYX EPHEMERAEFORMIS (LEPIDOPTERA: Air-borne dispersal of larvae of the gypsy moth and its influence on concepts of control.

The role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae. USDA For. Serv. Res. Pap. NE McManus, M.L., and Mason, C.J. The role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae. USDA Forest Serv. Res. Paper NE () Myers, J.H., Krebs, C.J.: Population cycles in rodents. Download PDF Hatched book full free.

Hatched available for download and read online in other formats. The Role of Behavior in the Dispersal of Newly Hatched Gypsy Moth Larvae. Michael L. McManus — Gypsy moth. Author: Michael L. McManus; Publisher: N.A; ISBN: N.A; Category: Gypsy moth; Page: 10; View: ; DOWNLOAD NOW».

Lymantria dispar dispar, commonly known as the gypsy moth, European gypsy moth, or North American gypsy moth, is a moth in the family Erebidae that is of Eurasian origin.

It has a range that extends over Europe, Africa, and North America. Carl Linnaeus first described the species Lymantria dispar in The subject of classification has changed throughout the years, resulting in confusion.

Host species. Gypsy moth larvae prefer oak trees, but may feed on many species of trees and shrubs, both hardwood and conifer. In the eastern US, the gypsy moth prefers oaks, aspen, apple, sweetgum, speckled alder, basswood, gray, paper birch, poplar, willow, and hawthorns, amongst other gypsy moth avoids ash trees, tulip-tree, cucumber tree, American sycamore, butternut, black.

First instars from small and large gypsy moth eggs differ significantly in their head capsule width, weight, hatching time and the length of thoracic setae. Pupal weight and the developmental period of immature stages of the gypsy moth originating from small or large eggs do not differ significantly.

Newly hatched gypsy moth larvae are carried to hosts by wind dispersal in the spring, landing on plants and then either remaining to feed or redispersing (Capinera and Barbosa ; Lance and. Leonard, D.E. () Airborne dispersal of larvae of the gypsy moth and its influence on concepts of control.

Journal of Economic Entomol – Leroy, A. & Leroy, J. () Spider watch in southern Africa Cape Town Stuik Publishers. Newly hatched gypsy moth larvae are morphologically and behaviorally adapted for airborne dispersal. The diel periodicity of both hatching and dispersal from the egg mass and photopositive behavior assure that larvae are in optimal position for dispersal when air turbulence is maximal at midday.

The rate of larval activity depends upon ambient temperature and relative humidity (R2 = ). The polyhedral inclusion bodies (PIBs) of Spodoptera littoralis nucleopolyhedrosis virus (SlNPV) were extracted from droppings of both the house sparrow Passer domesticus Raf.

and the cattle egret Bubulcus ibis Bon. Due to the wide host range of the SlNPV, the extracted PIBs were bioassayed versus newly hatched larvae (L1) of S.

littoralis, S. exigua, Trichoplusia ni, and Autographa. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is a moth in the family Lymantriidae of Eurasian origin.

Originally ranging from Europe to Asia, it was introduced to North America in the late s, where it has been expanding its range ever since. Description. The hatching of gypsy moth eggs coincides with budding of most hardwood trees.

The role of behavior in the dispersal of newly hatched gypsy moth larvae: Mcmanus, Michael L.; Mcmanus, Michael L. Forecasting gypsy moth egg-mass density: Campbell, Robert W.; Campbell, Robert W. Economic analysis of the gypsy moth problem in.

Gypsy moth females lay all of their eggs in a single mass, and studies on how variation in individual quality of larvae from a single egg mass affects dispersal tendency indicate that larvae from larger eggs dispersed more frequently than those from smaller eggs (Capinera and Barbosa ).

Gypsy moth occurs throughout much of the northern hemisphere. Its native range stretches from Japan, China, and Siberia across Russia to Western Europe and as far south as the Atlas Mountains of North Africa. Gypsy moths are host to a suite of natural enemies and these play a pivotal role in the dynamics of the gypsy moth populations.

Newly hatched gypsy moth caterpillars, which may be more allergenic than mature larvae, are capable of wind dispersal by means of a silken thread, a behavior called “ballooning.”15, 34, 35 First instar larvae of the closely related Douglas-fir tussock moth are also capable of airborne dissemination in this manner.

The role of movement behavior in dispersal is critical. This had been somewhat overlooked until J.S. Kennedy and C.G. Johnson made critical studies of dispersal in insects. Their insights showed that highly specialized behaviors have evolved in insects for dispersal, and that these behaviors are intricately woven in to the physiology and.survival and dispersal in the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L Received: 9 Sepember /Accepted: 1 November Abstract North American gypsy moths disperse as newly hatched larvae on wind currents in a behavior called ballooning.

Because ballooning occurs before ne-onates begin to feed, resources used in dispersal are lim.Test of Induced Foliar Defenses on Dispersal. To separate the direct effect of gypsy moth density on dispersal from that of possible herbivory-induced changes in host quality (Schultz and BaldwinRossiter et al.

), we selected an additional set of 44 trees (two additional transects of 22 red oaks each) for a larval release on 20 May according to the protocol described above.